Brussels Airlines is examining the A350 fleet

Airbus A350-1000 in factory paint (Photo: Jan Gruber).
Airbus A350-1000 in factory paint (Photo: Jan Gruber).

Brussels Airlines is examining the A350 fleet

Airbus A350-1000 in factory paint (Photo: Jan Gruber).
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Brussels Airlines is facing a far-reaching decision regarding the modernization and expansion of its aircraft fleet. In light of recent environmental regulations and business considerations, the airline is exploring the introduction of new models from Airbus for short and long-haul flights. The Airbus A321neo and the A350 could complement or replace the existing aircraft in the near future.

In an interview with the industry portal Aerotelegraph, Dorothea Von Boxberg, CEO of Brussels Airlines, gave insights into the company's considerations. The Airbus A321neo is considered an optimal candidate for short-haul flights. This machine could be used both on important business trips, for example from London to Brussels, and on tourist routes to popular destinations such as Malaga and Nice.

Strategic considerations and synergy effects

A key factor in choosing the A321neo is its efficiency compared to the A321XLR. The latter has additional fuel tanks, but these limit the payload capacity. Since freight transport represents a significant source of income for Brussels Airlines - especially on African routes - the choice of the A321neo is obvious from a business perspective. The aircraft offers enough capacity for cargo and checked baggage, which is particularly advantageous on routes to Africa, where passengers often carry additional baggage.

For long-haul flights, Brussels Airlines has to choose between the Boeing 787 and the Airbus A350. The decision could be in favor of the A350, which is already in use by the group companies Swiss and Lufthansa. This would enable synergies within the Lufthansa Group, to which Brussels Airlines belongs. The A350 also impresses with its better noise protection performance, which is particularly important at Brussels-Zaventem Airport, which has strict regulations in place to reduce aircraft noise.

Environmental regulations and operating hours

The new environmental regulations that are due to come into force at Brussels Airport from 2026 will significantly restrict night landings. No flights are allowed to land between 01:00 a.m. and 05:00 a.m. on weekends. This regulation excludes the use of the Airbus A330neo due to its noise emissions, although the older version, the A330-300, currently forms the backbone of the long-haul fleet.

Brussels Airlines currently operates nine A330-300s, and the fleet will soon be expanded to include a tenth aircraft. With this addition, the airline will resume service from Brussels to Nairobi, Kenya in summer 2024. The addition of new European routes, such as to Krakow in Poland, is also part of the expansion strategy.

Sustainability and efficiency

In addition to modernizing the fleet, Brussels Airlines is pursuing a comprehensive sustainability strategy. The decision to abandon the A330neo in favor of more environmentally friendly models such as the A350 underlines the airline's commitment to minimizing its environmental footprint while increasing operational efficiency. The use of the quieter and more fuel-efficient A350 enables the airline to operate later departures and landings, which increases flexibility in flight operations and meets the airport's strict noise regulations.

Expansion of the route network

Brussels Airlines is not only planning to renew its fleet, but also to significantly expand its route network. In addition to resuming the route to Nairobi and introducing new connections within Europe, the airline is increasingly focusing on its African destinations, which traditionally make up an important part of its business.

future prospects

Brussels Airlines' planned investments and strategic decisions show that the airline is committed to strengthening its position in international air transport. With a modern, efficient and environmentally friendly fleet, Brussels Airlines is well equipped to meet the challenges of the future while doing its part to reduce environmental impact.

Comment

  • Anon, 22. May 2024 @ 08: 59

    Again, very poorly researched. Swiss does not have an A350

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Editor of this article:

Amely Mizzi is Executive Assistant at Aviation Direct Malta in San Pawl il-Baħar. She previously worked in the Aircraft and Vessel Financing division at a banking group. She is considered a linguistic talent and speaks seven languages ​​fluently. She prefers to spend her free time in Austria on the ski slopes and in summer on Mediterranean beaches, practically on her doorstep in Gozo.
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Amely Mizzi is Executive Assistant at Aviation Direct Malta in San Pawl il-Baħar. She previously worked in the Aircraft and Vessel Financing division at a banking group. She is considered a linguistic talent and speaks seven languages ​​fluently. She prefers to spend her free time in Austria on the ski slopes and in summer on Mediterranean beaches, practically on her doorstep in Gozo.
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Comment

  • Anon, 22. May 2024 @ 08: 59

    Again, very poorly researched. Swiss does not have an A350

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